Headshot of Guido Olivieri
  • Associate Professor of Instruction
olivieri@austin.utexas.edu
Office Phone: 512-471-8015
Office Location: MBE 3.130
Specialties:
  • Musicology

Guido Olivieri (Ph.D. in Musicology- University of California, Santa Barbara; DMA in violin - Conservatory of Salerno, Italy) teaches courses on 18th-century Music History, History of Renaissance Music, History of Instrumental Music, Performance Practice, and Research Methods. He is also the director of the UT Early Music Ensemble “Austinato.”

His research has focused on the history of institutions, archival studies, performance practice, and on the circulation of music and musicians in 18th-century Europe.

Dr. Olivieri has presented papers at several international conferences (AMS, IMS, Biennial International Conference on Baroque Music, SECM, Italian Musicological Society), and published articles in collective volumes and scholarly journals (Basler Jahrbuch für Historische Musikpraxis, Analecta Musicologica, Notes, Studi Musicali, Pergolesi Studies). He has examined in particular the developments of the string repertory in Naples, looked at aspects of musical patronage, and reconstructed the artistic and cultural relationships between Naples and other European capitals.

He has contributed new entries to The New Grove Dictionary of MusicDie Musik in Geschichte und Gegenwart, and the Dizionario Biografico degli Italiani.

A Research Fellow at the University of Liverpool (UK) and at The Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America at Columbia University, Dr. Olivieri was awarded a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Michigan, where he also was a Visiting Assistant Professor.

After his Diploma in violin, he has devoted his attention to the study of the Baroque violin repertory and performed with several ensembles in Europe and the U.S.

Dr. Olivieri’s recent projects include the critical edition of a collection of inedited violin sonatas by Arcangelo Corelli, an article on 18th-century teaching at the Neapolitan Conservatories, and the critical edition of D. Cimarosa’s Il matrimonio segreto for Bärenreiter.